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Growth_and_development

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  • Is Your Toddler Communicating With You?

    Your baby is able to communicate with you long before he or she speaks a single word! A baby's cry, smile, and responses to you help you to understand his or her needs. In this publication the American Academy of Pediatrics shares information about how children communicate and what to do when there are

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  • Learning Disabilities: What Parents Need to Know

    Your child will learn many things in life—how to listen, speak, read, write, and do math. Some skills may be harder to learn than others. If your child is trying his best to learn certain skills but is not able to keep up with his peers, it’s important to find out why. Your child may have a learning

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  • Media History

    Please check one answer for each question. If the question does not apply to your family (ie, you do not own a computer or mobile device), leave that section blank.

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  • Next Stop Adulthood: Tips for Parents

    Parents need to give up much of the control over many of their young adult's decisions. But parents still worry about their child's safety, health, and success. This is where you need to trust the job you have done as a parent.

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  • Right From the Start: ABCs of Good Nutrition for Young Children

    As a parent, you are interested in your child's health. Your role is to provide healthy food in appropriate portions, and your child's role is to decide how much to eat. That is why it is important to understand how to provide healthy choices for your child.

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  • Single Parenting

    Information from the American Academy of Pediatrics on how single parents can support their children and themselves.

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  • Start Reading to Your Child Early

    A baby can enjoy books by 6 months of age! Here are things you can do with your child at different ages to help your child learn to love words and books.

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  • Temper Tantrums

    It's hard for young children to hold strong feelings inside. When they feel frustrated or angry, they often cry, scream, or stomp up and down. This is a temper tantrum. Temper tantrums are a normal part of your child's development. They usually begin around age 12 to 18 months, get worse between 2 and

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